... issues and tissues with a touch of the spicy from the spirit hag ...
... where women rule, are men just 'breeding bulls and babysitters' ?
Published on September 30, 2004 By mignuna In Current Events

 

What would life be like if the world were ruled by women ?.

 

We may never know, but we do have the examples of the rare but fascinating matriarchal cultures still in existence in today’s world to give us the ‘low-tech’ answer to this complex problem.

 

An example of such a culture is the Khasi (or Khasia), an agricultural people who live in the hill districts in Meghalaya state (North-Eastern India), where they arrived about 500 years ago, presumably from Tibet.

 

The Khasia, (a people short in stature with flat noses and mouths, high jaws, and small and straightened black eyes), now represent one of the major matriarchal tribes in modern-day India, with numbers estimated at 800,000.

 

At present, more than 80% of the Khasia are Christians, and almost every village has its own church. They do, however, continue to maintain their own age-old customs and traditions.

 

And that is when it starts to get good ...

 

According to a Khasia proverb, the civilisation originated from the female.

 

Succession to tribal office runs through the female line, passing from mother to youngest daughter or ‘heiress’ (who also happens to be the 'heir' of her maternal house and property). In all unions, the wife handles all monetary and property transactions.

 

Marriage is compulsory for Khasia males and is treated a command of God, with celibacy being viewed as sinful and said to be cursed.

 

Most marriages take place on the basis of 'prior mating', (meaning that the girls select their groom, and the males on the bridegrooms' side dress the bridegroom in a white loincloth and a turban and deliver him to the brides' house, staying for a short while, then leaving him there alone with her).

 

For the youngest daughter (or heiress), a husband is selected by her parents, and the groom is ‘captured’ in a traditional ceremony as part of the pre-wedding celebrations - he may even run away twice, and is expected to be coy and submissive when eventually 'caught'.

 

In Khasia society, cultivation and household work are done on the basis of mutual cooperation and understanding between wife and husband, and disagreement is rare. All daughters get a share of property but cannot sell it. The youngest sister has  responsibility for family rituals and ceremonies.

 

Monogamy is a custom among the Khasia. However, a woman can have more than one husband if the first husband happens to be sexually impotent, as all Khasia children take the surname of their mother, and illegitimacy is not frowned upon.

 

If a Khasia woman chooses to leave her husband, she takes their bed to her mothers’ home. If she’s really serious, she may take their dwelling and children with her, literally leaving him with no roof over his head and forcing him to take shelter with his mother.

 

Interestingly, a ‘male rights’ organization has been founded after Khasia men complained that women are overbearing and dominating. “We are sick of playing the roles of breeding bulls and baby-sitters" say the Khasia males. "We have no lines of succession. We have no land, no business".

 

 

 

References: LinkLink

 

 

 

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Comments
on Sep 30, 2004

"If a Khasia woman chooses to leave her husband, she takes their bed to her mothers’ home. If she’s really serious, she may take their dwelling and children with her, literally leaving him with no roof over his head and forcing him to take shelter with his mother." Hmm, sounds like the loot of divorce!

 

Certainly more women in politics would help dominate the warrior and thus wars.

on Sep 30, 2004
I've been reading Gimbutas for years about ancient cultures that may have been matriarchal, and some of her theories point to a more egalitarian system.
on Sep 30, 2004

 

Hmm, sounds like the loot of divorce !

now that you mention it stevendedalus, they're not so different from us after all in some ways 

Certainly more women in politics would help dominate the warrior and thus wars.

using a 'grass level' example such as this one, you're absolutely right, stevendedalus. i can't see any type of fighting force composed out of such men. fortunately, the conditions don't seem to occur to make this necessary. 

I've been reading Gimbutas for years about ancient cultures that may have been matriarchal, and some of her theories point to a more egalitarian system.

myrrander thanks for adding this. i share your interest in such things. i note your use of the word 'ancient' as opposed to the khasia, who are a present-day tribe (although of course their traditions are not).

the teachings behind their 'matriarchal' society are fascinating, and even the members of the 'mens' rights' group don't seek to entirely change the system, believing that this would untimately erode their society. (in this way i actually find it an interesting correlation to the 'patriarchal' vision we have of our own world).

i was speaking to a friend last night who filmed a documentary in 2003 on the 'touareg' (also known as 'tourag' or 'twareg', amongst others) of the sahara. they too have a traditionally matriarchal society, and i am so envious of his experience. myrrander, i'd be very interested to read anything you have written, or could reccommend on this subject, and thanks so much for your input, it's sincerely appreciated.

vanessa/mig XX

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